FRAMPTON CRITICAL REGIONALISM PDF

Emphasis, Frampton says, should be on topography, climate, light; on tectonic form rather than on scenography i. Frampton draws on phenomenology for his argument. This is revealed by the rational, modular, neutral and economic, partly prefabricated concrete outer shell i. He notes, for instance, feeling the contrast between the friction of the brick surface of the stairs and the springy wooden floor of the council chamber. In addition to his own writings on the topic, Frampton has furthered the intellectual reach of these ideas through contributions, in the form of introductions, prefaces and forewords, written for publications on architects and architectural practices that conform with the ethics of critical regionalism.

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But what could it mean to reactivate a text which, it seems, never really died in the first place? Architects are no exception and several practices currently position themselves in response to the age of transition that is ours. For him, it was within the specific conditions of a local context that an alternative approach could develop: an approach in which the tactile would surpass the visual, the tectonic would win over the scenographic, and the hybrid would be favoured over the homogeneous.

It was by resisting both the reductive Functionalism of Late Modern architecture and the superficial aesthetics of the newly acclaimed Postmodern architecture, that these architects and others elaborated on an architectural approach inspired by the conditions in which their practice was rooted. Frampton argued that within these projects a certain form of resistance seemed to develop at the precise moment that culture became a global concept.

Within a context then dominated by the powerful winds of Postmodernism, Frampton aimed to give attention to architects who had been relegated to the periphery of a system centred on star figures working in specific areas of Europe. The topographical conditions of peripheral European regions enabled him to explore practices with alternative stances towards Postmodernism. That ambition would result in 31 issues of AD focusing on the development of modern architecture in peripheral situations, including extensive features on non-European territories such as Chile, Brazil and Mexico.

But, for Frampton, clearly not interested in sentimental architecture, Critical Regionalism also needs to be situated in an ideological perspective. As such, Critical Regionalism proposed a set of disciplinary categories that aimed at understanding architecture beyond aesthetic universalisation.

Critical Regionalism became all too soon a historical document, understood as a poetic, acritical and apolitical interest in peripheral conditions. Schetsen 18 tc Extensively sketched from different angles in colourful ballpoint pens, the minimal intervention in the Caritas psychiatric hospital by De Vylder Vinck Taillieu shores up the building while keeping the ruin intact It is our conviction that the text represents today much more than a historical artefact.

While architects are faced with requirements of density to preserve open space for nature and agriculture, a certain sensibility to the qualities of the ground in which projects are embedded is imperative to rethink the concept of ground occupation.

And while the current state of ecological transition confronts the profession with short cycles and economies of means, local materials, building knowledge and craftsmanship become more and more appealing if not necessary. Widely distributed, the text was reworked and republished in a number of journals.

And while the text was recently reactivated by historians as a perspective that offers a more precise understanding of some of the concerns and challenges that drove architectural culture in the last two decades of the 20th century, several architects today still find the concept of Critical Regionalism relevant for their practice.

And as European norms strongly influence local building practices, in Europe Critical Regionalism helps to re-establish the link between facade and construction, between energy norms and tectonics, between embeddedness and contemporaneity. The concept contributes as such to the exploration of the close relationships between the building, its construction and its meaning.

Their intervention is minimal but essential. On the campus of the psychiatric hospital, they save a building that had lost its meaning by not only proposing an alternative programme, but carefully keeping the ruin intact. The intervention, essential in preventing the building from collapsing, becomes fully expressed through the lens of tectonics emphasised through their atypical colours. Several contemporary architectural practices position themselves deliberately towards the many faces of Postmodernism.

The Dutch firm Monadnock, for instance, oscillates consciously between architectural autonomy and site-specificity. But for Monadnock, context is not everything.

A second example of critical readings by architects who attempt to go beyond the initial objectives of the text can be found in the work of the Brussels-based firm BC Architects. Yet, according to BC Architects, if these aspects still have value today, it is not due to their opposition to forces of universalisation, but because of their importance for the long-term wellbeing of humankind.

To achieve their objectives, BC need to bypass regulations proscribing the execution of the project designed. They succeed by operating through three different offices: BC Studies elaborate specific analyses for the site, in close collaboration with local craftsmen, while BC Materials expand on these analyses to actually produce building materials, and BC Architects design the projects and supervise them.

Their critical regionalist character lies not so much in the built forms, nor in the embeddedness of their projects, but in a methodology enriched by these three branches. If this prize is retrospective, it could equally be prospective. Under this rubric, architecture empowered by the digital is being reduced to instrumental calculation. One thinks of the role to be played by BIM.

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An Architecture of Resistance – Kenneth Frampton (1983)

After a short period of working as an architecture in London in the s, he started to teach and write at Columbia University. Instead of taking an active role in building, preferred to be in a theoretician side. Additionally, he studied about history of architecture. In his works he aimed that create a better understanding of cultural identity, contemporary demands, and the contextual features in architectural sense. Also, architecture should not be captured by technology and history.

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India - Critical Regionalism

But what could it mean to reactivate a text which, it seems, never really died in the first place? Architects are no exception and several practices currently position themselves in response to the age of transition that is ours. For him, it was within the specific conditions of a local context that an alternative approach could develop: an approach in which the tactile would surpass the visual, the tectonic would win over the scenographic, and the hybrid would be favoured over the homogeneous. It was by resisting both the reductive Functionalism of Late Modern architecture and the superficial aesthetics of the newly acclaimed Postmodern architecture, that these architects and others elaborated on an architectural approach inspired by the conditions in which their practice was rooted. Frampton argued that within these projects a certain form of resistance seemed to develop at the precise moment that culture became a global concept. Within a context then dominated by the powerful winds of Postmodernism, Frampton aimed to give attention to architects who had been relegated to the periphery of a system centred on star figures working in specific areas of Europe. The topographical conditions of peripheral European regions enabled him to explore practices with alternative stances towards Postmodernism.

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Critical Regionalism for our time

While working for Douglas Stephen and Partners he designed in the Corringham Building, an 8-story block of flats in Bayswater , London, the architecture of which is distinctively modernist; in it became protected as a listed building. He has been a member of the faculty at Columbia University since , and that same year he became a fellow of the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies in New York -- whose members also included Peter Eisenman , Manfredo Tafuri and Rem Koolhaas -- and a co-founding editor of its magazine Oppositions. Frampton achieved great prominence and influence in architectural education with his essay "Towards a Critical Regionalism " — though the term had already been coined by Alexander Tzonis and Liane Lefaivre. In this paper, he mounts a criticism toward globalisation, mass consumer culture and the impact that this has had on architecture. For Frampton, this represents a particularly salient issue within the modern movement, as it has pushed architecture toward mediocrity, sameness and limited urban form which lacks any kind of cultural celebration or diversity. To remedy this, Frampton argues that the adoption of a more critical regionalist approach is required in architecture, one that takes into account specific considerations to place, topography, climate, and culture.

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